myreaders

July 17, 2015

Satellite Pass for Earth Station – Prediction of Ground Trace Coordinates & more

   Satellite  Pass  for  Earth  Stn  –  Prediction  of  Ground  Trace  Coordinates   &  more.

by  R C  Chakraborty,   July 17,  2015,   Pages   268 – 390.

(This   is   Sec. 7,    pp  268 – 390,   of   Orbital   Mechanics  –  Model   &   Simulation   Software  (OM-MSS),   Sec.  1  to 10,   pp  1  –  402.)

Satellites,  look  like  slow-moving  Stars,  are  most  visible  when  they  are  in  Sunlight  while  the  viewer  is  in  darkness.

A  typical  Satellite  in  low  Earth  orbit  (LEO)   circles  the  Earth  about  16  times  each  day.

The  Orbital  Velocity  of  a  LEO  satellite  is  about  7500  meters/sec.

The  Orbital  Velocity  of  a  Geo-stationary  satellite  is  about  3007  meters/sec.

The  Moon,  the  only  natural  satellite  of  earth  has  orbital  velocity  about  1003  meters/sec.

Satellite  Pass  for  Earth  Stn,   is  Computed   for  following  six  satellites  :   LANDSAT 8,   SPOT 6,   CARTOSAT-2B,   ISS (ZARYA),   GSAT-14,   and   MOON.

The  ‘Satellites  Pass’   goes  through  a  Time_Step  of  2 minutes  (120 sec).   For  Moon  the  Time_Step  is  of  1 hr  (3600 sec).

The  input  is  respective  Satellite’s  NASA/NORAD  ‘Two-Line Elements’  (TLE).

The  Output  is   Predictions   of   instantaneous   Ground  trace  Coordinates,   look  angles  &  more  at  each  Time_Step   on   computer   screen   in   a   Table   form    where

respective   columns   indicate  :

Col 1 – Orbit no,                        Col 2 – Node  Ascending  or  Descending,          Col 3 to 6 – Input  time  GMT  D H M S,

Col 7 – True  Anomaly,            Col 8 – Sat  Height  from  earth  surface,             Col 9 – Sat  at  Perigee,  Equator,  or  Apogee,

Col 10 – Sat  Velocity,              Col 11 , 12 – Latitude & Longitude at sub-satellite point on earth surface,

Col 13 – Sat  Slant  Range  from  earth  stn,             Col 14 – Distance  of  sub-satellite  point  from  earth  stn,

Col 15 , 16 – Sat  Pitch  &  Roll  angles,                      Col 17 , 18 – Sat  Elevation  &  Azimuth  angles  at  earth  stn,

Col 19 – Access  to  Sat  through  On  Board  Computer  or  Direct  Line  Of  Sight  based  on  elevation  angle  at  ES,

Col 20 , 21 – Sun  Elevation  &  Azimuth  angles  at  sub-Satellite  point  on  earth  surface,

Col 22 – Data  Acquisition  using  Visible  Band  Camera  or  Night  Vision  Devices  as  per  illumination  over   observed  surface,

Col 23 to 26 – Local  Mean  Time  at  earth  stn,       Col 27, 28 – Sun  Elevation  &  Azimuth  angles  at  earth  stn,

Col 29 – Distance  of  Sub-Sun  point  on  earth  surface  from  earth  stn,

 Col 30 – Line  number .

For   complete   post  (Page  268 – 390)    Move   on   to   Website   URL  :

http://myreaders.info/html/orbital_mechanics.html

July 11, 2015

Position Of Sun on Celestial Sphere at Input Universal Time

   Position   Of   Sun   on   Celestial   Sphere   at   Input   Universal   Time

by  R C  Chakraborty,  July 11,  2015,  Pages  57 – 67.

(This   is   Sec. 3,   pp 57 – 67,   of   Orbital   Mechanics  –   Model   &   Simulation   Software  (OM-MSS),   Sec 1  to 10,  pp 1 – 402.)

Sun  is  a  star  at  the  center  of  our  Solar  System.   Although  stars  are  fixed  relative  to  each  other,  but  Sun moves   relative   to   stars.

Sun   follows   a   circular  path  on  the  celestial  sphere,  once  a  year.   This  path  is  known  as  the  ‘Ecliptic’, representing  the  plane  of  the  Earth’s  orbit.

The  Inclination   of   the  Earth’s  equator  to  the  Ecliptic  (or  earth’s  rotation  axis  to  a  perpendicular  on  ecliptic) is  called  Obliquity  of  the  ecliptic.

The  Obliquity  of  the  ecliptic  is  currently  23.4392794383  deg   with  respect  to  the  celestial  equator,  at standard  epoch  J2000 .

The   position   of   any   point   on   the  Celestial  Sphere   is   given  with  reference   to   the   equator  or  the  ecliptic.

The  Earth  moves  in  an  elliptical  orbit  around  the  Sun.   Therefore  the  distance  from  Earth  to  Sun  is  not same   at   all   points   on   the   orbit.

(a)   Find   Julian   day   of   interest   corresponding   to   the   input   Universal   Time;

(b)  Find  Corresponding  Ecliptic  coordinates  :   Mean  anomaly  of  the  Sun,  Mean  longitude  of  the  Sun, Ecliptic   longitude   of   the   Sun,

      Ecliptic  latitude  of  the  Sun  is  always  nearly  zero,   Distance  of  the  Sun  from  the  Earth  in  astronomical   units,   Obliquity   of   the   ecliptic

(c)   Find   Corresponding   Equatorial   coordinates   :    Right ascension,    Declination.

In  addition  to  these  Ecliptic  and  Equatorial  coordinates,   computed  many  other  parameters  related  to  Sun’s Position  on  Celestial  Sphere.

The   Position   of   Sun   on   Celestial   Sphere   is   represented   by   computing   following  parameters   :

 1.     Semi-major axis (SMA),                  2.    Mean movement per day (n sun),      3.     Mean distance (As),

 4.     Mean anomaly (m sun),                  5.     True anomaly (T sun),                         6.     Eccentric anomaly (E sun),

 7.     Right ascension (Alpha),                 8.     Declination (Delta),                               9.     Mean longitude (Lmean),

 10.   Ecliptic longitude (Lsun),                11.   Nodal elongation (U sun),                   12.   Argument of perigee (W sun),

 14.   Obliquity of ecliptic (Epcylone),     14.   Mean dist (d_sun),                               15.   Radial distance (Rs).

For   complete   post   (Page 57 – 67)     Move    on    to    Website    URL   :

http://myreaders.info/html/orbital_mechanics.html

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.